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A Cuba that I want
Photo: Roberto Ruiz
Photo: Roberto Ruiz

A very young Cuban artist approached me recently to say hi, and he used the opportunity to make a comment that surprised and pleased me. Not all young people have succumbed to being seduced by the “privileges” of capitalism; most of them want something different from what exists, either here or there. “I’m very optimistic about everything that’s happening between Cuba and the United States. I travel a lot to Miami and New York, and we do need a store like Walmart or something like that, but not the crazy capitalism that exists there. I’m afraid that Cubans will lose their innocence in that sense, and all of the services for the population, and the social values that we have, especially in education, health and culture,” he told me.

Last December, a few hours after President Obama’s speech, top executives of U.S. corporations, investment funds, and law firms began setting into motion

something that had been stewing for some time: their Cuba Plan.

In a recently-published article, Princeton professor and former secretary of labor Robert Reich said that most U.S. companies do not feel any kind of alliance or commitment to their country or to raising wages for their workforce, and that their only commitment is to their stockholders and to maximizing profits.

I also would like to see a Walmart store in Cuba—several of them, why not. Stores like Apple and Home Depot, and even though I prefer Cuban coffee to Starbucks expresso, I would like to see a few of those scattered around Havana, too. I don’t have anything against the way those businesses are run; despite what Prof. Reich says, I think it’s right for them to defend their interests. However, if they were to have access to the Cuban market someday, I would like for them to think not only about their earnings, but also about how to give back and invest part of that wealth in society. My criteria is that whatever inspires and promotes the nation and people’s prosperity and well-being, including the participation of U.S. companies, should be welcomed, but with moderation and caution.

Investment is needed; Cuba needs to get back on its feet, evolve…. I think a lot of things need to be resolved, and a lot of things need to be taken care of, protected, and defended, especially everything that represents and is, in essence, the soul of the nation.

PRESIDENT
HUGO CANCIO
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
TAHIMI ARBOLEYA
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
ARIEL MACHADO
DESIGN & LAYOUT
PATRICIO HERRERA VEGA
PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR
OTMARO RODRÍGUEZ
COPYEDITING
CHARO GUERRA
TRANSLATION
ERIN GOODMAN
WEB EDITOR CUBA
MONICA RIVERO
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